Vascular Tumor

Vascular anomalies have been divided by medical experts into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Generally, vascular tumors are proliferative (i.e. growing or multiplying), while vascular malformations enlarge through expansion of a developmental anomaly without underlying proliferation. Vascular tumors in children, outside of hemangiomas, are rare.

There are different types of vascular tumors: (more…)

Early Intervention

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Vascular Surgery New York NYHemangiomas and vascular malformations require specific care and treatment for successful outcomes. There are differing opinions about when care should be given and when intervention strategies should begin. Some doctors encourage parents to wait until their child is older, around the age of six or seven, before having their child’s hemangioma treated. While the basis of this suggestion is rooted in that the malformation will begin the process of involution by this time, that is still a very long time for the malformation to be present.

Dr. Milton Waner, M.D. BCh, FCS (SA), is the Director of the Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center and Beth Israel Medical Center. Dr. Waner is a world renown doctor who not only has excellent academic credentials, but who also holds numerous US and international patents on medical devices. Dr. Waner’s expertise in the area of hemangiomas and vascular malformations is unsurpassed, and he has cared for patients from all over the world who come to the Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York seeking out his expert medical opinion and treatment. (more…)

Pyogenic Granuloma

There are different types of vascular lesions of the skin that can affect people of all ages. Pyogenic granuloma, also known as lobular capillary hemangioma, is a relatively common benign vascular lesion of the skin and mucosa that appears as an overgrowth of tissue. The exact cause of this vascular lesion is unknown, but the good news is that pyogenic granuloma is not infectious or malignant.

This vascular lesion usually occurs as a solitary growth that is prone to bleeding and ulceration. One of the most significant qualities of pyogenic granuloma is the rapid development of growth. Pyogenic granulomas typically evolve over a period of a few weeks, causing great concern to those affected and their loved ones. These vascular lesions most commonly affect children, young adults, and adults in their middle age. It is uncommon for pyogenic granuloma to affect infants or senior adults. (more…)

When Should a Hemangioma be Treated?

Hemangiomas are noncancerous growths that form due to an abnormal collection of blood vessels. When parents notice a hemangioma on their child and take them to a doctor for an evaluation, one of the first questions they ask is regarding when the hemangioma can be treated. At The Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York, we believe that this is the most fundamental question concerning infant and child hemangiomas.

The entire team at The Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York strongly urges parents to take their child to a Vascular Anomalies specialist in their area as soon as a hemangioma presents itself. All too often, pediatricians misdiagnose a hemangioma as just a “regular, raised birthmark” and assume that it will go away on its own. While this can be true for some, it is not true for all. Early laser treatments or topical timolol can prevent a superficial hemangioma from developing. For hemangiomas of the face or neck, for vascular tumors, and for vascular malformations, early and accurate diagnosis is essential to providing specialized treatment. (more…)

Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma

Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma is a rare vascular anomaly. Many parents mistake Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma for a birthmark, but it is actually a benign tumor of a child’s blood vessels. Because the tumor is benign, it can continue to grow, but it will not spread throughout the body.
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